SciBeh-Topic-Visualization

mental, italy, india, bangladesh, professional

Topic 18

mental italy india bangladesh professional suicide fear psychiatric adult consequence psychosocial general healthcare situation bangladeshi

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the mental health of the adult population in Bangladesh: A nationwide cross-sectional study

The recent COVID-19 pandemic has imposed threats on both physical and mental health since its outbreak. This study aims to explore the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on mental health among a representative sample of home-quarantined Bangladeshi adults. A cross-sectional design was used with an online survey completed by a convenience sample recruited via social media. 1,427 respondents were recruited & assessed by DASS-21 measure. Chi-square tests and multivariable logistic regressions were performed to examine the association of variables. The prevalence of stress, anxiety, and depression was 59.7%, 33.7%, and 57.9%, respectively. Chi-square tests suggest that age, gender, marital status, education, income, residence, and presence of an elderly family member are associated with mental health outcomes. Perceptions that the pandemic disrupted life events, affected mental health, jobs, the economy and education, predictions of a worsening situation, and uncertainty of the health care system capacities were significantly associated with poor mental health outcomes. Multivariable logistic regressions showed that sociodemographic factors and perceptions of COVID-19 significantly predict mental health outcomes. These findings warrant consideration of easily accessible low-intensity mental health interventions during and beyond this pandemic.
covid-19
perception
mental health
study
factor
adult
bangladesh
sociodemographic
mental, italy, india, bangladesh, professional
longitudinal, depression, anxiety, distress, association
Mental health risk factors during COVID-19 pandemic in the Polish population
July 21, 2020 · · Original resource · preprint

Background: The level of post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) associated with the COVID-19 outbreak, stress, anxiety and depressive symptoms was assessed. Risk factors for mental health in the Polish population have been identified. Methods: The 926 respondents completed a set of questionnaires consisting of questions concerning COVID-19, PTSS related to the COVID-19 outbreak (Impact of Event Scale-Revised, IES-R) and their mental health status (Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale, DASS-21). Results: Most respondents reported severe PTSS related to the COVID-19 outbreak (44.06%), normal intensity of depressive symptoms (52.38%), anxiety symptoms (56.05%) and stress (56.48%). Female gender, parental status, having a relationship, at least a two-person household are associated with higher PTSS and DASS-21 subscale. A few physical symptoms, a medical visit, quarantine, negative health evaluation, and chronic diseases, knowledge of the increase in the number of infected people and the number of deaths are associated with higher levels of PTSS. Some of the precautions and the need for additional information on COVID-10, the certainty of a high probability of contracting COVID-19, a low survival rate and concerns about loved ones are associated with higher PTSS. Conclusions: The indicated risk factors can be used to develop psychological interventions to improve mental health.
covid-19
mental health
stress
depression
anxiety
psychological intervention
psychiatry
mental, italy, india, bangladesh, professional
longitudinal, depression, anxiety, distress, association
Psychological responses during the COVID-19 outbreak among university students in Bangladesh

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted many individuals, including university students typically at a developmental stage of emerging adulthood, and facing disruptions to their education. University students may be particularly vulnerable to the mental health sequelae of the current COVID-19-related lockdown in Bangladesh. The study aimed to assess the prevalence of depression, anxiety, and stress and associated factors among university students in Bangladesh early in the COVID-19 outbreak. An internet-based survey was conducted from April 11 to April 24, 2020, involving 3,122 Bangladeshi university students aged 18 to 29 years (59.5% males; mean age 21.4±2 years). After providing informed consent, participants completed an internet-based survey assessing socio-demographic and personal lifestyle-related measures. The DASS-21 scale assessed depression, anxiety, and stress symptomatology. Binary logistic regression analyses were conducted. Prevalence estimates of depression, anxiety, and stress were 62.9%, 63.6%, and 58.6%, respectively. These rates tended to be higher than in previous surveys in the student population, particularly for the dimensions of stress and depression. Also, the pattern of associations with risk and demographic variables had shifted compared to previous work, suggesting situational impact on these. Depression, anxiety, and stress were prevalent among university students during the COVID-19 pandemic situation in April 2020 in Bangladesh. Although a causal relationship cannot be established, the findings suggest that monitoring and support programs may be useful to help students cope with the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak.
covid-19
education
survey
stress
depression
disruption
impact
monitoring
anxiety
measure
coping
help
bangladesh
sociodemographic
mental, italy, india, bangladesh, professional
longitudinal, depression, anxiety, distress, association
Mental Health and Its Psychosocial Predictors during National Quarantine in Italy against the Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID‐19)

There is scant evidence on the psychological impact of national quarantine and its psychosocial predictors. This research aimed at investigating the psychological impact of national quarantine in Italy, and the psychosocial factors that are supposed to influence this impact. A convenient sample of 1569 people living in Italy responded to an online
covid-19
italy
mental health
cross-sectional
coping
quarantine
well-being
psychosocial
stress, psychological, emotion, depressive, cope
mental, italy, india, bangladesh, professional
Generalized anxiety and depressive symptoms in various age groups during the COVID-19 lockdown. Specific predictors and differences in symptoms severity

Background. Previous studies carried out in different countries indicated that young adults experience higher levels of depressive and anxiety symptoms than older age groups during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, little is known about which epidemic-related difficulties and factors may contribute to these forms of emotional distress in various age groups. Purpose. The aim of the current study was to investigate: (i) differences in levels of depressive and generalized anxiety symptoms, as well as perceived difficulties related to pandemic across four age groups in the Polish population; (ii) which factors and difficulties related to pandemic are predictors of generalized anxiety and depressive symptoms in various age groups during the COVID-19 lockdown. Method. A total of 1115 participants (aged 18-85) took part in the study. The group was a representative sample of the Polish population in terms of sex, age, and place of residence. Participants completed online: The Patient Health Questionnaire-9, The Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7, Scale of Perceived Health and Life Risk of COVID-19, Social Support Sale, Scale of Epidemic-Related Difficulties. Results. Younger age groups (18-29 and 30-44) experienced higher levels of depressive and generalized anxiety symptoms than older adults (45-59 and 60-85 years). Difficulties in relationships and at home were amongst the strongest predictors of depressive and generalized anxiety symptoms in all age groups. Fear and uncertainty related to the spread of the virus were one of the most important predictors of emotional distress in all the groups apart from the adults between 18-29 years, whereas difficulties related to external restrictions were one of the most significant predictors of depressive and anxiety symptoms only in the youngest group. Conclusions. Our results indicate that the youngest adults and those experiencing difficulties in relationships among household members were the most vulnerable to depressive and generalized anxiety symptoms during the COVID-19 lockdown. Thus, it is important to plan preventive and therapeutic interventions to support these at-risk individuals in dealing with the challenges related to the COVID-19 pandemic.
covid-19
lockdown
symptom
depression
outbreak
study
anxiety
poland
mental, italy, india, bangladesh, professional
longitudinal, depression, anxiety, distress, association
Level and Predictors of PTSD Symptoms Among Health Workers and Public Service Providers During the COVID-19 Outbreak

In the frontline of the pandemic stand healthcare workers and public service providers, occupations which have proven to be associated with increased mental health problems during pandemic crises. The objective of current study was to determine the level and predictors of post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety and depression symptoms among
covid-19
mental health
depression
symptoms
emotion
anxiety
ptsd
health worker
burnout
psychiatry
mental, italy, india, bangladesh, professional
longitudinal, depression, anxiety, distress, association
The impact of COVID-19 pandemic on mental health & wellbeing among home-quarantined Bangladeshi students: A cross-sectional pilot study

Background: COVID-19 is imposing threat both on physical and mental health since its outbreak. Bangladesh adopted lockdown strategy with potential consequences on day to day life, mental and physical health and this study aims to explore the impact of COVID-19 on mental health and wellbeing among Bangladeshi students. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted between 9th and 23th April 2020 among 505 college and university students. Data was collected by using online questionnaire including DASS 21 and IES. Descriptive analysis and bivariate linear regression were performed to examine the association of variables. Results: 28.5 % of the respondents had stress, 33.3% anxiety, 46.92% depression from mild to extremely severe, according to DASS 21 and 69.31% had event-specific distress from mild to severe in terms of severity according to IES. Perceiving physical symptoms as COVID-19 was significantly associated with DASS stress subscale (B=3.71, 95% CI: 1.01 to 6.40), DASS anxiety subscale (B= 3.95, 95% CI: 1.95 to 5.96), DASS depression subscale (B=3.82, 95% CI: 0.97 to 6.67) and IES scale (B=7.52, 95% CI: 3.58 to 11.45). Additionally, fear of infection, financial uncertainty, inadequate food supply, absence of physical exercise and limited or no recreational activity had significant association with stress, anxiety, depression and post-traumatic symptoms. Conclusion: This COVID-19 outbreak imposes psychological consequences on people to a great extent which requires attention from the concerned authorities to cope with this situation mentally. The perception about the outbreak can also play a big role in psychological impact.
covid-19
mental health
depression
cross-sectional
anxiety
quarantine
bangladesh
well-being
mental, italy, india, bangladesh, professional
longitudinal, depression, anxiety, distress, association
Pandemic-Induced Depression and Anxiety in Healthcare Professionals

Medical staff has been at the centre of the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic, facing diverse work-related stressors. Studies from various countries have shown that healthcare professionals have an increased risk of burnout and mental disorders during pandemic outbreaks. The present study aimed to investigate what kind of work-related stressors healthcare professionals in Germany have been facing and how they have been affected psychologically by the COVID-19 pandemic. N=300 healthcare professionals completed an online survey including the ISR symptom checklist to measure psychological well-being and questions on help-seeking behaviour. Findings were analyzed using t-tests, regression, and comparisons to large clinical and non-clinical samples assessed before and during the pandemic. Results show that healthcare professionals were most affected by protective measures at their workplace and changes in work procedures. Psychological symptoms, especially of anxiety and depression, were significantly more severe than in a non-clinical pre-pandemic sample and in the general population during the pandemic. At the same time, most professionals indicated that they would not seek help for psychological concerns. These findings indicate that healthcare employers need to pay increasing attention to the mental health of their staff, encourage help-seeking behaviour, as well as provide access to mental health support.
covid-19
pandemic
stress
depression
wellbeing
anxiety
mental disorder
work
burnout
mental, italy, india, bangladesh, professional
longitudinal, depression, anxiety, distress, association
Resilience contributes to low emotional impact of the COVID-19 outbreak among the general population in Italy

Background The COVID-19 outbreak is severely affecting overall mental health with unknown psychological consequences. The Italian Government has implemented a massive lockdown to decrease the spread of the virus. Although a strong psychological impact is possible, few evidences are still available. Past studies have shown that resilience decreases the negative effects of stress promoting mental health. For these reasons, this study aimed to examine depression, anxiety, and stress among the Italian general population during the phase characterizing by lockdown, and to investigate the role of resilience as a potential predictor. Methods A total sample of 6314 Italian people participated in this study. Participants were recruited between March 10 and May 4 2020 through an online survey, the majority of whom from Northern Italy. The Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 (DASS-21) (a measure of mental health status) and the Resilience Scale (RS) (a measure of resilience) were administered. Also, demographic data and lockdown related information were collected. DASS-21 cut-off scores were used to verify the mental status among the participants. Subsequently, a correlational analysis was carried out to examine relationships between DASS-21 and RS. Lastly, three hierarchical regression analyses were conducted using the three DASS-21 scales as dependent variables and the RS scales as independent variables controlling for age, gender, and education. Results The prevalence of moderate to extremely severe symptoms among participants was 36.1% for depression, 28.7% for anxiety, and 35.6% for stress. Results of correlational analysis showed that resilience factors, such as meaningfulness, self-reliance, existential aloneness, and equanimity, are inversely associated with depression, anxiety, and stress. Results of regression analyses indicated that all the resilience factors were statistically significant in predicting anxiety, while meaningfulness, perseverance, existential aloneness, and equanimity predicted depression and stress. Conclusions During the lockdown following the COVID-19 outbreak, about a third of respondents reported moderate to extremely severe depression, anxiety, and stress. The present study suggests that psychological resilience may independently contribute to low emotional distress and psychological ill-being. These findings can help explain the variability of individual responses during the COVID-19 outbreak. Psychological interventions to enhance resilience might provide useful approaches to overcome COVID-related emotional impact.
covid-19
italy
lockdown
variability
mental health
stress
depression
resilience
anxiety
stress, psychological, emotion, depressive, cope
mental, italy, india, bangladesh, professional
The psychological impact of the COVID-19 crisis on young Swiss men participating in a cohort study
Nov. 19, 2020 · · Original resource · preprint

Aims The COVID-19 pandemic caused many disturbances to daily life worldwide and may also have significantly affected people’s psychological well-being. The present study aimed to describe the psychological impact of the crisis on our sample of young Swiss men and to examine differences due to their linguistic region, experiencing COVID-19 symptoms and living arrangements. Method Based on an ongoing cohort study, we assessed a general-population sample of young Swiss men (n = 2345; average 29 years old) shortly before (from April 2019) and early on during the COVID-19 crisis (between 13 May and 8 June 2020). This was a unique opportunity to estimate the crisis’ psychological impact in form of depression, perceived stress and sleep quality (assessed before and during COVID-19), and any crisis-induced fears, isolation or psychological trauma. Associations of psychological impact with living arrangements, experiencing COVID-19 symptoms and linguistic region (German-speaking vs French-speaking) were investigated using linear regression models. Findings By the time participants responded to our questionnaire, less than 1% had been tested positive for COVID-19, 2.6% had been tested negative, and 14.7% had had some COVID-19 symptoms but had not been tested. About 8.2% of the sample reported at least some symptoms of psychological trauma (≥ 24 points on the Impact of Event Scale). On average, participants reported higher levels of fear for others (43.6% at least moderate) and economical fear (12.7% at least moderate) than fear for themselves (5.8% at least moderate). Those living alone and those who reported having COVID-19 symptoms themselves, or knowing someone with symptoms, reported higher overall psychological impact in the form of depression, perceived stress, sleep quality, psychological trauma, fear and isolation. Associations with linguistic region varied by outcome, with higher levels of depression and fear in French-speaking regions and higher levels of perceived stress and isolation in German-speaking regions. Interpretation The crisis had a considerable impact on the psychological well-being of our sample of young Swiss men, and some groups were more affected than others: those living alone and those who had shown COVID-19 symptoms themselves; or had known someone with symptoms, may have felt a greater psychological impact from the crisis. Supporting those at a higher risk of psychological consequences in such crises, whether through structural measures or via individual support, should be an important aspect of crisis management and could help reduce the overall impact of the current pandemic on Switzerland’s population.
covid-19
symptom
mental health
stress
depression
wellbeing
psychological impact
switzerland
sleep quality
stress, psychological, emotion, depressive, cope
mental, italy, india, bangladesh, professional