SciBeh-Topic-Visualization

tackle, european, fund, database, indonesia

Topic 27

tackle european fund database indonesia security vietnam launch public crucial urgent policy coordinate initiative include

Lessons learnt from easing COVID-19 restrictions: an analysis of countries and regions in Asia Pacific and Europe

The COVID-19 pandemic is an unprecedented global crisis. Many countries have implemented restrictions on population movement to slow the spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 and prevent health systems from becoming overwhelmed; some have instituted full or partial lockdowns. However, lockdowns and other extreme restrictions cannot be sustained for the long term in the hope that there will be an effective vaccine or treatment for COVID-19. Governments worldwide now face the common challenge of easing lockdowns and restrictions while balancing various health, social, and economic concerns. To facilitate cross-country learning, this Health Policy paper uses an adapted framework to examine the approaches taken by nine high-income countries and regions that have started to ease COVID-19 restrictions: five in the Asia Pacific region (ie, Hong Kong [Special Administrative Region], Japan, New Zealand, Singapore, and South Korea) and four in Europe (ie, Germany, Norway, Spain, and the UK). This comparative analysis presents important lessons to be learnt from the experiences of these countries and regions. Although the future of the virus is unknown at present, countries should continue to share their experiences, shield populations who are at risk, and suppress transmission to save lives.
covid-19
non-pharmaceutical intervention
strategy
loosening restrictions
transmission prevention
government response
healthcare system
lockdown cessation
international comparison
experience
tackle, european, fund, database, indonesia
mobility, crime, gdp, employment, restriction
European Semester Spring Package: Recommendations for a coordinated response to the coronavirus pandemic
May 20, 2020 · · Original resource · webpage

The Commission has proposed today country-specific recommendations (CSRs) providing economic policy guidance to all EU Member States in the context of the coronavirus pandemic, focused on the most urgent challenges brought about by the pandemic and on relaunching sustainable growth. The recommendations are structured around two objectives: in the short-term, mitigating the coronavirus pandemic's severe negative socio-economic consequences; and in the short to medium-term, achieving sustainable and inclusive growth which facilitates the green transition and the digital transformation.
covid-19
growth
recommendation
economic impact
sustainability
package
european union
opinion, science, society, insight, economist
tackle, european, fund, database, indonesia
Public Health Principles for a Phased Reopening During COVID-19: Guidance for Governors
April 17, 2020 · · Original resource · report

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to progress, most jurisdictions have implemented physical distancing measures to reduce further transmission, which have contributed to reductions in numbers of new cases. As chains of transmission begin to decline, along with new COVID-19 cases, there will need to be decisions at the state level about how to transition out of strict physical distancing measures and into a phased reopening. This document provides an assessment of the risk of SARS-CoV-2 transmission in a variety of organizations and settings that have been closed during the period in which physical distancing and mitigation measures have been put in place. We outline steps to reduce potential transmission during the reopening of these organizations and settings, building on the proposed phased approach from the National Coronavirus Response: A Road Map to Reopening. Reopening businesses and other sectors represents one of many steps that will need to be taken to revitalize communities recovering from the pandemic, restore economic activity, and mitigate the unintended public health impact of the distancing measures that were necessary to confront the epidemic of COVID-19. A discussion of larger community-wide considerations for holistically enhancing recovery can be found in the Appendix. State-level decision makers will need to make choices based on the individual situations experienced in their states, risk levels, and resource assessments, and they should do so in consultation with community stakeholder groups. Different parts of the country face varying levels of risk and have different resources available to confront these uncertainties. These decisions will need to be accompanied by clear and transparent communication to gain community engagement around the greatly anticipated reopenings. Individuals, businesses, and communities have a role to play in taking actions to protect themselves and those around them during this time. In this report, we offer a framework for considering risks regarding the likelihood of transmission and potential consequences of those transmissions. This is accompanied by proposed measures for nonessential businesses, schools and childcare facilities, outdoor spaces, community gathering spaces, transportation, mass gatherings, and interpersonal gatherings. This is followed by proposed action steps for state-level decision makers on how to utilize risk assessment findings.
covid-19
communication
usa
social distancing
education
public health
guidance
risk
government
economy
mitigation
resources
security
assessment
decision making
reopening
business
physical distancing
document
state
opinion, science, society, insight, economist
tackle, european, fund, database, indonesia
Global coordination on cross-border travel and trade measures crucial to COVID-19 response

When WHO declared the COVID-19 outbreak a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC) on Jan 30, 2020, under the provisions of the International Health Regulations (2005) (IHR), it recommended against “any travel or trade restriction”.1WHOStatement on the second meeting of the International Health Regulations (2005) Emergency Committee regarding the outbreak of novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV).https://www.who.int/news-room/detail/30-01-2020-statement-on-the-second-meeting-of-the-international-health-regulations-(2005)-emergency-committee-regarding-the-outbreak-of-novel-coronavirus-(2019-ncov)Date: Jan 30, 2020Date accessed: May 7, 2020Google Scholar The recommendation was based on data available at the time, evidence from previous outbreaks, and principles underpinning the IHR. It formed an important part of WHO's messaging about how states could effectively respond in a coordinated way. Instead, over the following months, according to WHO, 194 countries adopted some form of cross-border measure—eg, travel restrictions, visa restrictions, border closures, among others—with little reproach from WHO or other actors in the international community.2WHOWeekly update on COVID-19, April 8–15, 2020. Health Emergencies Programme. World Health Organization, Geneva2020Google Scholar This response is a sharp increase from at most 25% of member states that imposed trade and travel restrictions during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic and the 2013–16 outbreak of Ebola virus disease in west Africa.3Worsnop CZ Domestic politics and the WHO's International Health Regulations: explaining the use of trade and travel barriers during disease outbreaks.Rev Int Organ. 2017; 12: 365-395Crossref Scopus (2) Google Scholar Indeed, WHO's recommendation against measures such as travel restrictions and border closures became a point of criticism of the organisation's role at the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic.4Watts A Stracqualursi V WHO defends coronavirus response after Trump criticism. CNN, April 8, 2020https://www.cnn.com/2020/04/08/politics/who-responds-trump-claims-coronavirus/index.htmlDate accessed: May 7, 2020Google ScholarThe universal adoption of cross-border measures raises fundamental questions about what coordination means during a pandemic, and what role WHO has in facilitating this. Coordinated action among states in an interconnected world underpins effective prevention, detection, and control of disease outbreaks across countries.5National Academy of Medicine Commission on a Global Health Risk Framework for the FutureThe neglected dimension of global security: a framework to counter infectious disease crises. National Academies Press, Washington, DC2016Crossref Google Scholar As parties to the IHR, governments agree that coordination is important to ensure that measures do not unnecessarily disrupt international trade and travel. Thus, during major disease outbreaks, part of WHO's role is to provide evidence-informed guidance on cross-border measures.
covid-19
guidance
who
government
economy
travel
transmission reduction
business
impact
trade
international
measure
tackle, european, fund, database, indonesia
mobility, crime, gdp, employment, restriction
The ASEAN’s responses to COVID-19: A policy sciences analysis

The World Health Organisation (WHO) announced the new coronavirus disease (COVID-19) it as a pandemic on March 11th, 2020. The pandemic has brought havoc globally as more than 190 countries and territories are affected as of 30 April 2030. The crisis suggests that no country can deal with the pandemic alone. International cooperation including regional cooperation is essential for any country to survive. We are particularly interested in Association of South East Asian Nation (ASEAN) cooperation and performance under COVID-19 because it has been one of the regions where regional cooperation on health security has been functioning based on lessons from SARS 2003 and H1N1 2009. The “One Vision, One Identity, One Community” of ASEAN has merits under COVID-19 response but remains invisible. The method encompasses analysis of published materials issued by and accessible from the ASEAN website, complemented with analysis for media articles including social media, supported by published academic journal articles. All of the authors have expertise on ASEAN policies in the field of health, disasters, and regional policy and planning. Some authors have also worked from various international organisations working on issues related to the ASEAN region. This paper aims to document and analyse how ASEAN member states respond to COVID-19. It asks how to cooperate under the One-ASEAN-One Response framework. This paper also compares the 10 member states’ policy responses from January to April 2020. We utilise the framework of policy sciences to analyse the responses. We found that the early regional response was slow and lack of unity (January - February 2020). Extensive early measures taken by each member state are the key to the success to curb the spread of the virus. Although, during March and April 2020, ASEAN has reconvened and utilised its existing health regional mechanism to try to have a coherent response to the impacts. Strengthening future collaboration should be implemented by recognizing that there is a more coherent, multi sectoral, multi stakeholders and whole-of-ASEAN Community approach in ensuring ASEAN’s timely and effective response to the pandemic.
covid-19
health system
publication
response
collaboration
article
disaster
opinion, science, society, insight, economist
tackle, european, fund, database, indonesia
The Riyadh Declaration: the role of digital health in fighting pandemics

The COVID-19 pandemic has exposed weaknesses in health and care systems and global public health responses, some of which can be addressed through data and digital science. The Riyadh Declaration on Digital Health was formulated during the Riyadh Global Digital Health Summit, Aug 11–12, 2020, a landmark forum that highlighted the importance of digital technology, data, and innovation for resilient global health and care systems.
covid-19
communication
misinformation
data science
technology
public health response
healthcare system
recommendation
opinion, science, society, insight, economist
tackle, european, fund, database, indonesia
COVID-19 Reveals Urgent Need to Strengthen the World Health Organization
April 30, 2020 · · Original resource · article

From the time China reported a novel coronavirus to the World Health Organization (WHO) on December 31, 2019, it took barely 4 months to become a pandemic, killing hundreds of thousands, and growing daily. It is now clear that the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) had been circulating in Wuhan, China, for weeks before China reported it to the WHO, and that authorities hid information. China maintained SARS-CoV-2 was not readily transmissible between humans. The WHO published China’s data, but without independently verifying their accuracy. President Trump subsequently blamed the WHO for its slow and “China-centric” response. On April 14, 2020, he announced a suspension of US voluntary contributions to the agency. Although the WHO was unable to verify the Chinese data, it was proactive, including widely sharing the genomic sequencing of the virus with international scientists. On January 30, 2020, the WHO declared coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) a global health emergency, urging rigorous containment including testing, contract tracing, and quarantine. Broad criticism of the organization is unfounded, and is particularly damaging because the pandemic is poised to deeply affect sub-Saharan Africa. That said, legitimate concerns about the WHO include its reluctance to insist China allow a robust WHO team on the ground and its praising of China’s transparency. The crisis now unfolding could also become a historic opportunity to strengthen the WHO. Reforms must start with recognizing the global public good achieved by the WHO.
covid-19
compliance
china
public health
who
history
response
africa
transmissibility
funding
international
tackle, european, fund, database, indonesia
hotspot, u.s, rise, record, come
Database of public health guidance on COVID-19
May 14, 2020 · · Original resource · webpage

To inform the ongoing response to the COVID-19 pandemic, specifically, to inform the development of public health guidance to prevent the spread of COVID-19, we have created a database of COVID-19 public health guidance produced by international organisations. This database is primarily for the use of relevant stakeholders in the Health Protection Surveillance Centre, the National Public Health Emergency Team, the Department of Health, and Health Service Executive.
covid-19
development
public health
guidance
healthcare
database
international
information sharing
tackle, european, fund, database, indonesia
library, open, preservation, psa, tool
Initiatives from the CERN community in global fight against COVID-19
April 8, 2020 · · Original resource · webpage

Members of the CERN community have shown ingenuity and generosity in their contribution to the struggle against the COVID-19 pandemic. The “CERN against COVID-19” taskforce, which was established at the end of March to identify and support these initiatives, has already received hundreds of messages suggesting ideas ranging from producing sanitizer gel to designing and building sophisticated medical equipment. Indeed, CERN and its community can make use of important resources such as the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid, mechanical workshops, sophisticated design and prototyping facilities, advanced technologies and expertise ranging from science and engineering to industrialisation.
covid-19
healthcare
science
resources
response
industry
suggestion
task force
tackle, european, fund, database, indonesia
library, open, preservation, psa, tool
Policy response, social media and science journalism for the sustainability of the public health system amid the COVID-19 outbreak: The Vietnam lessons

Having geographical proximity and a high volume of trade with China, the first country to record an outbreak of the new Coronavirus disease (COVID-19), Vietnam was expected to have a high risk of transmission. However, as of 4 April 2020, in comparison to attempts to containing the disease around the world, responses from Vietnam are seen as prompt and effective in protecting the interests of its citizens, with 239 confirmed cases and no fatalities. This study analyzes the situation in terms of Vietnam’s policy response, social media and science journalism. A self-made web crawl engine was used to scan and collect official media news related to COVID-19 between the beginning of January and April 4, yielding a comprehensive dataset of 14,952 news items. The findings shed light on how Vietnam—despite being under-resourced—has demonstrated political readiness to combat the emerging pandemic since the earliest days. Timely communication on any developments of the outbreak from the government and the media, combined with up-to-date research on the new virus by the Vietnamese science community, have altogether provided reliable sources of information. By emphasizing the need for immediate and genuine cooperation between government, civil society and private individuals, the case study offers valuable lessons for other nations concerning not only the concurrent fight against the COVID-19 pandemic but also the overall responses to a public health crisis.
covid-19
big data
policy
transmission
crisis management
effectiveness
government response
social media
cooperation
sustainability
news
resource allocation
success
vietnam
opinion, science, society, insight, economist
tackle, european, fund, database, indonesia