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outdoor, student, education, enthusiast, socio

Topic 5

outdoor student education enthusiast socio instruction recreate teen stay creative text uncertain teacher experimental academic

Managing through uncertain times: A study to understand the effects of conducting socio-academic life online during COVID-19

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused uncertainty and disruptions in daily life. It has mandated social distancing and online education. Teens are spending a significant amount of time online and less time on extracurricular activities including team sports, choir/orchestra, and school socials. The cancellation of SAT, the switch to online AP exams, and the Credit/No Credit policy for 2nd-semester all contribute to the uncertainty in students regarding their future. Our project aims to create a survey that seeks opinions from teens about how they are managing with online socialization, the effectiveness of the online school, and stress levels. Using convenience sampling, adolescents (n = 168) were invited to participate in an anonymous online survey. Participants were asked about the effectiveness of online socializing, online education, hobbies, and extracurriculars to determine stress levels. We looked at models with two dependent stress variables: “low energy, insomnia and headache” and “forgetfulness and disorganization”. We used descriptive, regression, and correlation analysis to assess what the predictors of anxiety and stress are. Results show that stress levels are highly correlated with online exposure, online schooling, the credit/no credit, and home environment. The purpose of this study is to help school communities and leaders understand the effects on teens during the shelter in place order and identify areas of improvement in socio-academic life. Further studies need to be conducted to follow up with the findings of this project.
covid-19
social distancing
behavioral science
uncertainty
stress
psychology
effect
study
disruption
social isolation
social science
teenager
social responsibility
outdoor, student, education, enthusiast, socio
stress, psychological, emotion, depressive, cope
Managing through uncertain times: A study to understand the effects of conducting socio-academic life online during COVID-19

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused uncertainty and disruptions in daily life. It has mandated social distancing and online education. Teens are spending a significant amount of time online and less time on extracurricular activities including team sports, choir/orchestra, and school socials. The cancellation of SAT, the switch to online AP exams, and the Credit/No Credit policy for 2nd-semester all contribute to the uncertainty in teens regarding their future. Our project aims to create a survey that seeks opinions from teens about how they are managing with online socialization, the effectiveness of the online school, and stress levels. Using convenience sampling, adolescents (n = 168) were invited to participate in an anonymous online survey. Participants were asked about the effectiveness of online socializing, online education, hobbies, and extracurriculars to determine stress levels. We looked at models with two dependent stress variables: “low energy, insomnia and headache” and “forgetfulness and disorganization”. We used descriptive, regression, and correlation analysis to assess what the predictors of anxiety and stress are. Results show that stress levels are highly correlated with online exposure, online schooling, credit/no credit, and home environment. The research focuses on the areas where we can better support teens during lockdown situations by building safer environments for online socialization, and online education.
pandemic
social distancing
uncertainty
adolescent
effectiveness
stress
disruption
online survey
daily life
anxiety
online education
outdoor, student, education, enthusiast, socio
stress, psychological, emotion, depressive, cope
Psychology Students’ Motivation and Learning in Response to the Shift to Remote Instruction During COVID-19

The COVID-19 pandemic led to dramatic shifts in the teaching and learning of psychology. The purpose of this study was to document the impact of those shifts on undergraduate psychology students’ motivation and self-regulation of learning during the initial shift to remote instruction. Psychology majors (N = 358) attending a public land-grant university in the southeastern U.S. voluntarily completed a survey at the end of the Spring 2020 semester. Closed- and open-ended items assessed students’ self-reported behavioral and psychological wellness, motivation, and learning experiences during the COVID-19 outbreak. A convergent mixed methods analysis was used in which open-ended questions provided context and experiential nuance to quantitative findings. Students reported increases in sleep, social media use, gaming, and procrastination, but decreases in academic motivation and self-regulation (e.g., focusing, juggling responsibilities). Over 75% reported increases in stress, which they attributed most frequently to motivational and academic challenges. Students reported learning less in most of their classes following the shift. They attributed this to numerous internal (e.g., self-regulatory/motivational difficulties) and external (e.g., online delivery modality, changes to workload, poor communication, insufficient instructional accommodations) factors. Although most perceived their instructors as understanding, nearly half reported a decline in instructional quality and communication after the shift to remote instruction. Over one third of students reported feeling less certain about their future educational plans. Implications for the provision of institutional and instructional supports for college students during and beyond the pandemic are provided.
covid-19
motivation
communication
survey
perception
experience
wellbeing
psychology
student
learning
remote learning
shift
outdoor, student, education, enthusiast, socio
respond, teach, simple, footage, regimen
College students’ motivation and study results after COVID-19 stay-at-home orders

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, many institutions of higher education had to close their campuses and shift to online education. Here, we investigate how stay-at-home orders impacted students. We investigated results obtained by 15,125 bachelor students at a large Dutch research university during a semester in which the campus was closed and all education had shifted online. Moreover, we surveyed 166 students of the bachelor of psychology program of the same university. Results showed that students rated online education as less satisfactory than campus-based education, and rated their own motivation as having gone down. This was reflected in a lower time investment: lectures and small-group meetings were attended less frequently, and student estimates of hours studied went down. Lower motivation predicted this drop in effort. Moreover, a drop in motivation was related to fewer credits being obtained during stay-at-home orders. However, on average students reported obtaining slightly more credits than before, which was indeed found in an analysis of administered credits. In a qualitative analysis of student comments, it was found that students missed social interactions, but reported being much more efficient during online education. It is concluded that whereas student satisfaction and motivation dropped during the shift to online education, increased efficiency meant results were not lower than they would normally have been.
covid-19
motivation
social interaction
online education
stay-at-home
outdoor, student, education, enthusiast, socio
intention, behavior, message, guideline, preventive
Learning during the lockdown: real-time data on children’s experiences during home learning
May 18, 2020 · · Original resource · report

In this report, we present initial evidence on how children are spending their time during the lockdown, with a focus on home learning activities and the home learning resources available in different families. This evidence is based on a new survey, specially designed by researchers at IFS and the Institute of Education (IoE). The survey was completed online by over 4,000 parents of children aged 4–15 between Wednesday 29 April and Tuesday 12 May 2020.
covid-19
education
lockdown
experience
children
reopening
inequality
socioeconomic status
low-income
online learning
parent
remote learning
difficulty
real-time
outdoor, student, education, enthusiast, socio
respond, teach, simple, footage, regimen
Predictors of perceived teachers' and school counsellors’ work stress in the transition period of online education in schools during the COVID-19 pandemic

The present study aimed to investigate the predictors of work stress in elementary and upper-secondary school teachers and school counsellors in the initial period of online education in schools during the COVID-19 pandemic. A total of 964 school professionals (90.7% teachers; 9.3% school counsellors) participated in the study. The results indicated that school professionals who reported higher ICT self-efficacy, had more positive attitudes toward distance education and perceived higher level of supervisor support experienced less stress. In addition, the participants that reported taking care of their own preschool or younger school children during the schools' closure reported higher levels of stress.
covid-19
stress
school
study
online education
teacher
outdoor, student, education, enthusiast, socio
mental, italy, india, bangladesh, professional
“Generation invisible“. Higher education students’ (non)use of webcams in synchronous online learnin

The Spring term 2020 saw a global switch to emergency remote teaching in higher education due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Alongside asynchronous online learning activities, students were called to participate in synchronous videoconferencing sessions, substituting the traditional on-campus face-to-face courses. Given the preponderance of students to avoid using webcams, this study sought to investigate usage behavior, as well as potentially related course variables and individual characteristics. 3,527 students from across all institutional faculties of a comprehensive German university took part in an online survey. Students’ webcam usage behavior was related to personal thoughts and feelings (e.g., privacy), to course characteristics (e.g., group cohesion), and it differed due to specific groups (gender, study degree). Results of this research shed light on a globally present phenomenon and provide a foundation for further investigation.
covid-19
higher education
online learning
outdoor, student, education, enthusiast, socio
news, misinformation, internet, medium, fake
Creative Lockdown? A Daily Diary Study of Creative Activity During Pandemics

The current COVID-19 pandemic is influencing our lives in an enormous and unprecedented way. Yet while this impact is being intensively studied with regard to a broad range of health, social, and psychological aspects, the effects of COVID-19 for creativity have been overlooked. Here, we explore COVID-19-lockdown’s consequences for creative activity. To this end, we relied on two extensive diary studies. The first, held in March 2019 (pre-pandemic), involved 78 students who reported their emotions and creativity over two weeks (927 observations). The second, conducted in March 2020 (during the pandemic and lockdown), involved 235 students who reported on their emotions, creativity, and the intensity of thinking and talking about COVID-19 over a month (5,904 observations). Multilevel meditations and dynamic structural equation modeling have shown that compared to 2019, during the lockdown, students engaged slightly, yet statistically significantly more in creative activities. Analysis of diaries collected during the pandemic also showed that students who spent more time discussing or searching for information about COVID-19 were not only more engaged in different creative activities but also declared more positive emotions. We propose potential explanations of these unexpected results along with future studies directions.
covid-19
analysis
behavioral science
lockdown
longitudinal change
modeling
wellbeing
creativity
outdoor, student, education, enthusiast, socio
stress, psychological, emotion, depressive, cope
Quasi-Experimental Evaluation of Text-based Crisis Patterns in Youth following Hurricane Florence in the Carolinas, 2018

IMPORTANCE Crisis text lines have proven to be an effective and low-cost means for delivering texting-based mental health support to youth. Yet there has been limited research examining the use of these services in capturing the psychological impact of youth affected by a weather-related disaster. OBJECTIVE This ecologic study examined changes in help-seeking behavior for youth in North and South Carolina, USA, before and after Hurricane Florence (2018). DESIGN AND MAIN OUTCOMES A retrospective, interrupted time-series design was used to examine pre- and post-hurricane changes in crisis text volume among youth help seekers in the Carolinas for the following outcomes: (1) text for any reason; (2) stress & anxiety; (3) depression; and (4) suicidal thoughts. RESULTS Results showed an immediate and sustained increase in crisis texts for stress/anxiety and suicidal thoughts in the six weeks following Florence. Overall, an immediate 15% increase in crisis texts for anxiety/stress (SE=.05, p=0.005) and a 17% increase in suicidal thoughts (SE=.07, p=0.02) occurred during the week of the storm. Text volume for anxiety/stress increased 17% (SE=.08, p=0.005) and 23% for suicidal ideation (SE=.08, p=0.01) in the 6-week post-intervention period. Finally, forecast models revealed observed text volume for all mental health outcomes was higher than expected in the 6 weeks post-Florence. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE A low-cost, crisis texting intervention platform provided 24/7 mental health support available to young people in the Carolinas impacted by Hurricane Florence. These findings highlight a new application for text-based crisis support services to address the mental health consequences among individuals following a weather-related disaster.
usa
intervention
mental health
stress
depression
psychology
support
crisis
anxiety
suicide
youth
outdoor, student, education, enthusiast, socio
longitudinal, depression, anxiety, distress, association
Year 10 and 12 school students' opinions on returning to partial schooling during the COVID-19 pandemic: an action research prospective survey

Objective Educational provision changed during the lockdown period of the COVID-19 outbreak in the UK (20th March to 31st May 2020) with schooling moving online. The Prime Minister announced a timetable for partial reopening of school on 10th May. With the return to partial schooling imminent, the views of year 10 and year 12 students were surveyed. Design Cross-sectional web-based survey disseminated via closed social media fora. Setting A structured questionnaire hosted on Google Forms™ and disseminated via two Facebook™ fora in the week prior to the original stated date of return to partial schooling for year 10 and year 12 students (20th to 27th May 2020). Participants United Kingdom school students in year 10 (age 14 to 15 years old) and year 12 (age 16 to 17 years old). Main outcome measures Views of year 10 and year 12 students on returning to schools with a focus on their opinions on government guidance, impact on their future, and how remote learning has impacted on their education. Results 1534 students (yr10 n= 1007 66%, yr12 n=527 34%) completed the questionnaire. Students were equally divided in opinion with 781 (51%) preferring to return to partial schooling with limited educational contact and 753 (49%) preferring to remain isolated at home with remote schooling, when an unsure option was removed. A majority (73%, n=1111) of students feel unsafe or unsure that Government guidelines will be enough to protect them from COVID-19 in a school environment. 79% (n=1205) of students felt that COVID-19 has impacted on their future. 15% (n=231) of students said they have had no additional support or guidance from their school during remote learning. Conclusions Year 10 and 12 school students were divided equally in their preferences about returning to partial school. Exploration of their uncertainty by thematic analysis revealed the source to be anxieties around safety. Students feel they are being put at risk and because guidelines will be impossible to enforce in a school environment. Some students recognised a need to return to education despite this perceived risk. An inequity in the standard of education was identified with 15% (n=231) of students reporting that they did not receive any support during the 87 days of lock down. School students expressed desire that their concerns be heard by the Government. Better consideration needs to be taken of the concerns of these year groups in the future.
covid-19
safety
uk
social distancing
loosening restrictions
risk perception
young people
opinion
school reopening
student
outdoor, student, education, enthusiast, socio
vaccination, adherence, hesitancy, uptake, sectional